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TALK ACTION INTERACTION
03 – 05 October 2012 test

UNIVERSITY OF ŁÓD¬, POLAND
INSTITUTE OF ENGLISH STUDIES
CHAIR OF ENGLISH AND GENERAL LINGUISTICS

USEFUL INFORMATION ON ŁÓD¬

The aim of the conference is to provide a multilingual, international platform for exploration and exchange of research findings, perspectives, and experience in the field of discourse and conversation analysis across communicative and cultural contexts. The event will bring together academics, researchers, practitioners, and students concerned with the analysis of language in use. Special emphasis will be given to empirical research on manifestation of mental representations in interaction.

We invite papers on all topics related to how mental representations get surfaced, performed, and accomplished in interactional contexts including, but not limited to:

•    Goals, intentions and commitments in communication
•    Non-linguistic interaction in communication
•    Gestures as a communicative system
•    Natural language understanding and reasoning in spoken language
•    Multimodal interaction
•    Meaning in institutional contexts
•    Interaction in a foreign language
•    Identities as discursive-performative / multiple / fragmented /  constructed and negotiated / narrated / etc.
•    Categorization and personal identity
•    Construal of meaning
•    Identity and bilingualism
•    Identity and foreign language learning/teaching
•    Identity and belonging
•    Discourse analysis
•    Conversation analysis


The Following key note speakers have been invited and confirmed their participation in the conference:

Prof. Alan Cienki – Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands
RESEARCHING TALK IN INTERACTION FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF DYNAMIC MULTIMODAL COMMUNICATION


Gesture with speech has been analyzed as having the potential to take on semantic functions (such as accomplishing reference), pragmatic functions (such as showing the speaker’s attitude towards an utterance), and discourse-structuring functions (e.g., on the narrative level) (Kendon 2004 and elsewhere). But how can researchers arrive at these interpretations? One way is by distinguishing different levels of analysis in order to arrive at the ‘meaning’ of the gestures. Here we will consider the levels analysis of gestures’ forms, their functions in context, and (if relevant) the modes of representation that they employ (based on Müller 1998). Examples of ongoing research within the Amsterdam Gesture Center will demonstrate the application of these methods in the analysis of gestures across the range of functions: from reference to concepts used by entrepreneurs (Clarke, Cornelissen, & Cienki), to the pragmatics of stancetaking on ethical issues (Debras & Cienki), to how participants in interaction use a range of gestural forms and functions to align with each other (Bietti & Cienki), to how speakers show viewpoint shifts on the narrative/discourse level (Stec). The research provides insights into intersubjectivity and shared meaning making as dynamic processes which can be reflected in, and constructed through, behaviors in different modalities of communication.
 
Prof. Anna Cie¶licka – UAM, Poznań, Poland; Texas A&M International University, USA
CONTEXT IN LANGUAGE PROCESSING: THE DYNAMICS OF MEANING CONSTRUAL IN THE BILINGUAL MIND

Prof. Jean-Rémi Lapaire – University of Bordeaux, France
MOVED BY GRAMMAR
The human body plays a crucial role in the expression of grammatical forms and functions. Grammar in grams also means grammar in the flesh. As speakers interact verbally with each other, the grammatical structures they produce and the grammatical meanings they construct receive overt visuo-kinetic coding. Heads tilt, gazes shift, hands move as modal judgements are made and aspectual notions conveyed, as time relations are expressed and quantities assessed. The grammar that shapes meanings and holds utterances together requires a fair amount of bodily action. It follows that grammar should not be considered independently of movement, although it usually is. But how are these movements to be interpreted ? What do they mean ? What do they achieve ? Can they be used to explore some of the conceptual, socio-interactional and discourse-pragmatic dimensions of grammar ?

HAND MADE (45') - WORKSHOP
In this accessible and stimulating workshop, we learn to observe the spontaneous hand activity of ordinary speakers dynamically and creatively. After a careful warm up session, we start exploring gestural forms. As we watch (silent) video projections on the walls, we identify patterns and motifs, hand shapes and orientations, phases, postures and positions, as well as the dynamics of movement. We each make our own selection of motions and form individual phrases in collage fashion. We develop short, idiosyncratic variations and eventually compose and perform together short pieces of choreography to the accompaniement of music. A brief discussion follows in which we analyse the symbolic and interactional properties of the gestures initially shown on the video and used as « dance material » in our own small compositions.

Using co-speech gestures as movement material in a simple hand dance acts as a powerful revealer of the inbuilt dramatic and aesthetic properties of speech synchronous gesticulation. Speakers are born choreographers who unconsciously use their gesture space as a special kind of dance or performance space- a space where cognitive operations are staged and socio-pragmatic processes symbolically acted out.

All welcome. No prior knowledge or experience of the performing arts is required. Exercises are designed to make you feel relaxed and comfortable-not self-conscious. There will be no physical contact between participants.

Prof. Sue Widdicombe – University of Edinburgh, UK
THE DELICATE BUSINESS OF IDENTITY
In this talk, I will discuss studies which treat identity as accomplished through talk within the context of other social activities (such as justifying complaints, securing knowledge, denying responsibility).  These draw on recordings of interactions with members of youth subcultures, people with chronic illness, Syrians, men, and workers. They show how identities are mobilised, constructed, negotiated and managed in interaction, and sometimes treated as sensitive and accountable matters. I begin to delineate some of the interpersonal, inferential, and moral issues that attend identity ascription, and how this is managed by speakers. However, these and many other studies of identity are based on interactions in interviews about identity. So, is there something about this type of interaction that makes identity a delicate business? Is identity work somehow shaped through the research context in which it is embedded? Is it useful to distinguish the use of identity as a topic and as a tool in interaction? These issues will be explored by examining instances where participants invoke the interviewer’s identity, and distinct yet comparable settings of speed dating, police interrogation and news interviews. 

Prof. Robin Wooffitt – University of York, UK
COMMUNICATION, INTERSUBJECTIVITY AND CONSCIOUSNESS
In this presentation I examine instances of poetic convergence: speech events that occur naturally in everyday social interaction, in which one participant produces a spoken turn that inadvertently exhibits a poetic relationship to a co-participant's unspoken thoughts or unarticulated mental imagery. The first account of the phenomenon, provided by the  sociologist Emanuel Schegloff, is summarised. Analysis of a subsequent corpus of candidate instances provides evidence of robust properties. These include shifts in attentional consciousness of the person whose unarticulated thoughts or imagery are subsequently reflected in another's turn. Methodological problems associated with the analysis of poetic convergence are raised throughout the paper; substantive issues for future research are outlined in the conclusion.


The event will combine plenary addresses, workshop, discussions, and paper sessions in thematic strands. Papers will be allocated 20 minutes plus 10 minutes for questions.
The language of the conference is English.

Important Dates
15 June 2012, abstracts due
EXTENDED CALL FOR PAPERS TILL  - 15th August 2012,
Notification of acceptance - 20th August 2012
30 September 2012, all conference fees due
15 September 2012, final program
03 – 05 October 2012 conference

Abstracts
300 word abstracts should be submitted by August 15, 2012 (new deadline) /see above/. Abstracts should be registered via this web page at www.filolog.uni.lodz.pl/action/form_registration.php

Only plain text will be accepted by the web page, so abstain from using footnotes or any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline).
The length of the presentation will be limited to 20 minutes with a 10 minute discussion following each.




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